Articles Comments

Riding the buses » Archive

The Canglang (Blue Wave) Pavilion, Suzhou, China

The Canglang (Blue Wave) Pavilion, Suzhou, China

The classical gardens of Suzhou date back to the 6th century BC. More than 50 of these gardens are still in existence and 9 of them are regarded as the finest examples of Chinese “mountain and water” gardens, according to UNESCO World Heritage. The earliest of these is a garden called the Canglang Pavilion, which was first built in the early 11th century by the Northern Song poet Su Sunqin. During its hundreds of years … Read entire article »

Filed under: China, Gardens of the world

A mountain climbing experience of a lifetime (even if you’re a newbie)

A mountain climbing experience of a lifetime (even if you’re a newbie)

Every summer since 1906 the Alpine Club of Canada has held a general mountaineering camp (the GMC), usually in the mountains of British Columbia. Last summer Andrew Sunter participated in the camp that was held in the Scotch Peaks range in the Purcell Mountains near Radium (close to the Bugaboos, one of the world’s great alpine rock climbing areas). We turned off the highway at Radium and drove our cars for an hour up a dirt … Read entire article »

Filed under: Adventure travel, Canada, Travel itinerary

Payogan Homestay: Bali

Payogan Homestay: Bali

Debra Lynkowski and her partner Marc Archambault spent 6 weeks at a Bali homestay during their mid-life, 8-month trip around world. Bali surprised me more than any other place in our round-the-world trip. We chose the island as a place to regroup before leaving Southeast Asia. It had been described as being exotic and beautiful and, frankly, it was one of the few places in Southeast Asia that wasn’t in the midst of the monsoon season. We’d … Read entire article »

Filed under: Indonesia, Memorable moments, Places you can stay a while

What’s with the Lonely Planet?

What’s with the Lonely Planet?

Editorial: I’ve always felt a special bond with the Lonely Planet, probably because I travelled overland from Melbourne to London the same year its co-founders—Tony and Maureen Wheeler—travelled overland from London to Melbourne. Same trip but flipped. That was way back in 1972. One of my sisters said I should try to get my letters about the trip published but I ignored her suggestion. The Wheelers self-published a book about their experience under the Lonely Planet … Read entire article »

Filed under: Editorials

Trekking in the legendary Nam Ha National Protected Area, Laos

Trekking in the legendary Nam Ha National Protected Area, Laos

Ron Perrier, a Canadian who is travelling the world, recently made his way to Luang Namtha in northern Laos, the starting point for the “trekking mecca of Southeast Asia”. The border crossing from Chiang Khong, Thailand into Laos changed on the day I crossed. Instead of crossing the Mekong River by boat, the route changed to the New Bridge several kilometers south. After paying the $42 fee (Canadians pay more than any other country), I … Read entire article »

Filed under: Adventure travel, Laos, Memorable moments, Travel itinerary

Taking a mid-life gap year to see the world

Taking a mid-life gap year to see the world

Debra Lynkowski and her partner, Marc Archambault, were at the peak of their careers when they decided to sell their house, find a temporary home for their cats, and spend 8 months traveling around the world. Q: What compelled you to do this? A: I was going through a pretty intense period of self-reflection, which in itself was difficult to do because we were so fully engaged with our work and other commitments. I just knew that … Read entire article »

Filed under: Around the world, Spiritual travel, Travel itinerary, Why travel